Krzemionki Prehistoric Striped Flint Mining Region

Brief description

Located in the mountain region of Świętokrzyskie, Krzemionki is an ensemble of four mining sites, dating from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age (about 3900 to 1600 BCE), dedicated to the extraction and processing of striped flint, which was mainly used for axe-making. With its underground mining structures, flint workshops and some 4,000 shafts and pits, the site features one of the most comprehensive prehistoric underground flint extraction and processing systems identified to date. The site provides information about life and work in prehistoric settlements and bears witness to an extinct cultural tradition. It is an exceptional testimony of the importance of the prehistoric period and of flint mining for tool production in human history.

Unesco WHS list ref:  1599

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

Thanks to Milan for a card from this site. [scan to follow]

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Tarnowskie Góry Lead-Silver-Zinc Mine and its Underground Water Management System

Brief description

Located in Upper Silesia, in southern Poland, one of the main mining areas of central Europe, the site includes the entire underground mine with adits, shafts, galleries and water management system. Most of the site is situated underground while the surface mining topography features the remains of the 19th century steam water pumping station, which testifies to continuous efforts over three centuries to drain the underground extraction zone. It has made it possible to use undesirable water from the mines to supply towns and industry. Tarnowskie Góry represents a significant contribution to the global production of lead and zinc.

Unesco WHS list ref: 1539

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

poland-tarnowskie-gory-web

Thankyou to Ivan for the card from this site.

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Wooden Tserkvas of the Carpathian Region in Poland and Ukraine

Brief description

Situated in the eastern fringe of Central Europe, the transnational property numbers a selection of sixteen tserkvas (churches). They were built of horizontal wooden logs between the 16th and 19th centuries by communities of Orthodox and Greek Catholic faiths. The tserkvas bear testimony to a distinct building tradition rooted in Orthodox ecclesiastic design interwoven with elements of local tradition, and symbolic references to their communities’ cosmogony. The tserkvas are built on a tri-partite plan surmounted by open quadrilateral or octagonal domes and cupolas. Integral to tserkvas are iconostasis screens, interior polychrome decorations, and other historic furnishings. Important elements of some tserkvas include wooden bell towers, churchyards, gatehouses and graveyards.

Unesco WHS list ref:  1424

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

Thanks to Milan for lovely cards from 2 of these tserkvas. I love the idea that the card still has a hint of the scent from all of the flowers that were decorating it when you visited. [scan to follow].

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Centennial Hall in Wrocław

Brief description

A landmark in the history of reinforced concrete architecture, the hall was erected in 1911-1913 by the architect Max Berg as a multi-purpose recreational building, situated in the Exhibition Grounds. In form it is a symmetrical quatrefoil with a vast circular central space that can seat some 6,000 persons. The 23m-high dome is topped with a lantern in steel and glass. The Centennial Hall is a pioneering work of modern engineering and architecture, which exhibits an important interchange of influences in the early 20th century, becoming a key reference in the later development of reinforced concrete structures.

Unesco WHS list ref:  1165

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

poland-wroclaw-hala-ludowa

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Wooden Churches of Southern Małopolska

Brief description

The wooden churches of southern Little Poland represent outstanding examples of the different aspects of medieval church-building traditions in Roman Catholic culture. Built using the horizontal log technique, common in eastern and northern Europe since the Middle Ages, these churches were sponsored by noble families and became status symbols. They offered an alternative to the stone structures erected in urban centres.

Unesco WHS list ref:  1053

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

poland-wooden-churches

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Churches of Peace in Jawor and Świdnica

Brief description

The 2 churches which form this site are the largest timber-framed religious buildings in Europe. They were built in the former Silesia in the mid-17th century, amid the religious strife that followed the Peace of Westphalia. Constrained by the physical and political conditions, the Churches of Peace bear testimony to the quest for religious freedom and are a rare expression of Lutheran ideology in an idiom generally associated with the Catholic Church.

Unesco WHS list ref:  1054

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

poland-jawor-churches

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Kalwaria Zebrzydowska: the Mannerist Architectural and Park Landscape Complex and Pilgrimage Park

Brief description

Kalwaria Zebrzydowska is a breathtaking cultural landscape of great spiritual significance. Its natural setting – in which a series of symbolic places of worship relating to the Passion of Jesus Christ and the life of the Virgin Mary was laid out at the beginning of the 17th century – has remained virtually unchanged. It is still today a place of pilgrimage.

Unesco WHS list ref:  905

I have never visited this site.

From my collection

poland-kalwaria-zebrzy

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No spare cards available from this site.